The Zomet Experience

The Zomet Experience

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Electric Shaver

Electric Shaver

What's the difference between a razor and an electric shaver?
Buying a new fridge?

Buying a new fridge?

Is removing the bulb from the refrigerator enough?
  • Enough Legalese when Confronting an Enemy!
    Point Of View

    Enough Legalese when Confronting an Enemy!

    I am writing this close to the time of reciting the first Selichot prayers before the beginning of the new year, at the end of the Shabbat before the holiday (or one week earlier if, as happens this year, there are not at least three days between Shabbat and Rosh Hashanah). A refrain in the Selichot which is repeatedly recited is the one quoted above: “Do not judge us.” We beg G-d and ask to be released from judgement on this fateful day. Our request to be released from judgement and to have “what we skipped in the prayers be a source of love” is based on the sentiments of King David, also quoted above: “For no human being can ever be considered righteous before You.” We are not capable of standing up to the demands of strict law, and we can only survive if they are applied together with a measure of mercy.

    David was the one who “established the standard of repentance.” (“The words of David Ben Yishai, and the words of the man who was chosen to be supreme” [Shmuel II 23:1] – “He established the standards for repentance” [Avoda Zara 5a].) He asked to close the accounts of his sins (including sending Uriyah, Batsheva’s husband, to his death) outside of the realms of the courts – that is, beyond a strict legal framework, and not within regular legal processes. David knew that within the confines of the legal system there was not much opportunity for mercy. In fact, not only were his chances for mercy low, we see in his words a general call against ruling according to strict legal principles whenever there is reason for special considerations: “No human being can ever be considered righteous before You.”
    1643 : Nitzavim
    28 Elul 5776 01/10/2016
    Taking a Torah Scroll off the Bima to Help a Handicapped Person / Rabbi Yosef Tzvi Rimon
    When a handicapped man is called to the Torah, are we allowed to put a small table next to the Bima for the Torah scroll and read the Torah from there?
    A Complete Task / Rabbi Atiel Gilady
    A person who starts things but never finishes lives in a perpetual state of frustration, even if he or she is not always aware of the reason for the feeling.
  • Using an oven on Shabbat

    Using an oven on Shabbat

    Is there any problem with using the oven on Shabbat under the control of a timer?
    Milk and Meat Dishes in the Same Dishwasher

    Milk and Meat Dishes in the Same Dishwasher

    Can the same dishwasher can be used for both dairy and meat dishes (not at the same time).
    Recycling Weekly Parsha Sheets

    Recycling Weekly Parsha Sheets

    Can I recycle the parsha sheets in such a way that the contents are not desecrated or harmed?
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